3 Signs That Your Air Conditioner Needs Replacing

3 Signs That Your Air Conditioner Needs Replacing

Ductless air conditioners are tough systems, but they aren’t invincible. Sooner or later, you’re going to need to replace your air conditioner no matter how well you took care of it. You don’t want your system to die on you in the middle of a hot summer day, so the best way to avoid gaps in your climate control is to recognize the signs that your air conditioner is dying before it actually reaches the end of its lifespan. Let’s examine 3 of the most common signs that you need to replace your air conditioner.

Age

Ductless air conditioners are built to last between 15 and 20 years. Past that point, they are more and more liable to develop serious problems and lose efficiency. You can keep your air conditioner operating past that age if you want to, but it will be much more expensive on average and less energy efficient. Talk to a professional about replacing your air conditioner once it gets older than 20 years.

Higher Operating Costs

Wear and tear from decades of normal use will cause a gradual loss in system efficiency. This causes the air conditioner to have to stay on for longer and longer to affect the same temperature changes, which means that you’ll have to pay more to use it every month. This is a very common sign that your air conditioner is reaching the end of its life.

Repair Frequency

The older your system is, the more worn out the various parts that make it up are. That makes it far more likely for parts to fail, often in a slow cascade. If you need to have your air conditioner repaired every few months instead of every few years, it would be much cheaper just to replace it.

Call Magnolia Plumbing, Heating & Cooling for all of your ductless air conditioner replacement needs. We serve all of Washington, DC.

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