Do I Need to Fill My Ductless System with Refrigerant This Summer?

Refrigerant is a vital component of practically every air conditioning system in use today. Despite that, it isn’t well-understood by the majority of homeowners across the country. As a result, we often get questions like the one above about how refrigerant should be handled in an air conditioning system. Let’s examine the role of refrigerant in your air conditioning system, and when you need to add more to it.

Refrigerant

So, what is refrigerant, anyway? Refrigerant is not one substance, but a catchall term for a variety of different heat transfer fluids that all serve the same purpose. In your ductless system, refrigerant is the fluid that is used to transfer heat between the home and the outside environment. The system evaporates refrigerant in either the inside unit or the outside unit to absorb heat from the surrounding air. Then, it sends the refrigerant gas down the refrigerant line to the other unit where it is condensed back into liquid. This releases the stored heat. The liquid refrigerant is then sent back to the original unit and the cycle begins again. The system never consumes refrigerant, but recycles it back and forth during operation.

When to Refill

Normally, you shouldn’t ever need to refill the refrigerant levels in your ductless system. The initial charge of refrigerant the system gets upon installation should be enough to last for its entire lifespan. The only time when this is not the case is when a leak develops in the refrigerant line. This will drain the system of refrigerant, and will eventually cause a breakdown if the leak is not patched.

Magnolia Plumbing, Heating & Cooling installs and services ductless systems throughout Baltimore, MD. If you need a ductless system installed, repaired, maintained, or replaced, call today to speak with one of our ductless experts.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s